The Dark King: Chapter Headers

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As with Fae, The Dark King has some of the most amazing chapter headers.

Quotes from Mythology, Poetry and Prose are used to expand the chapter before you’ve even read it.

A little sneak peek into the chapter or for some of the latter chapters a warning of what’s to come!

From Hermes Trismegistus to Edgar Allan Poe to Emily Bronte, here’s a look into some of our favourites from The Dark King.

 ….

Chapter One

“Hark ye O old man and list to my warning;
By ye free from the bondage of night.
Surrender not your soul to the
BROTHERS OF DARKNESS.
Keep thy face ever turned towards the light”

-The Emerald Tablet of Thoth
From Table Six, The Key of Magic.

The Emerald Tablet of Thoth, also referred to as the Emerald Tablets of Hermes, is thought to be the work of Hermes Trismegistus (‘Hermes the Thrice-Great’), a legendary Egyptian god.

 

Chapter Three

“All we see or seem is but a dream within a dream”
Edgar Allan Poe

Take this kiss upon the brow!
And, in parting from you now,
Thus much let me avow—
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone?
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.

The poem questions the way one can distinguish between reality and fantasy, asking,
“Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream”?

The poem dramatizes a confusion in watching the important things in life slip away.
Realizing he cannot hold onto even one grain of sand leads to his final question that all things are a dream.

 

Chapter Seven

“Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.it will not lead you astray
– Rumi

Rumi met an enigmatic mystic named Shams who changed his life, transforming him into an ecstatic preacher.
Two years after their meeting, Shams suddenly disappeared and this had a profound effect on Rumi; he devoted the rest of his life to training initiates and writing poetry.

 

Chapter Thirteen

Whatever our souls are made of his and mine are the same
– Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights.

It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he’s handsome, Nelly, but because he’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton’s is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.

 

And finally I think John Milton sums up Devilyns story perfectly in Chapter Nines header,

 

He who reigns within himself and rules passions, desires and fears is more than a king
– John Milton

 

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